Local attractions

 MORVERN PENINSULA

Morvern is a place to enjoy the great outdoors at your own pace.  Whether cycling along forestry or estate tracks, kayaking around the coastline, or walking by shore or on the hill there is a wealth of discoveries to be made.

For an Eagle’s Eye view of the north western end of the peninsula, see this BBC video: https://www.facebook.com/BBCOne/videos/1800592839974264/

Morvern Games and Gala Week

Morvern Games and Gala Week has been an annual event in recent years, taking place mid-July with traditional Highland Games, and a week-long programme of activities, including a half-marathon, Regatta, Children’s Highland Games event, Ceilidh’s, and much, much more. Details of the next Games and Gala Week commencing 14th July 2018 will be announced in due course.

Rahoy Hills Nature Reserve

Explore the Black Glen, the shores of Loch Arienas, Beinn na h-Uamha and Beinn Iaidain; learn more by visiting Scottish Wildlife Trust website – go to the link below:

 https://scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk/docs/027__108__reserve_leaflets__Rahoy_Hills_Wildlife_Reserve__1307102552.pdf

Morvern Community Woodland, Achnaha

A broadleaf woodland, with a circular walk, adjacent to the seashore, it is host to a variety of activities throughout the year.

www.facebook.com/MorvernCommunityWoodlands

Fly Fishing

Local hill lochs offer fly fishing for brown trout, from shore or boat, whilst the R.Aline and White Glen can give great sport when the Salmon and Sea Trout are running (permits available from www.ardtornish.co.uk/activities/sporting-pursuits/fishing/

Sea Fishing

Fish for mackerel and more in the Sound of Mull, by boat or from shore

Wildlife

Morvern peninsula is home to some of Scotland’s rarest wildlife, including Otters, Pinemarten, Wild Cat, Golden Eage and Sea Eagle. Porpoises, and Whales as well as the more common species like Red and Fallow Deer, Buzzards, Hen Harriers and suchlike.

It is not uncommon to see Eagles and Buzzards from the living room of Willow Brae, nor Slow Worm basking in the sunshine.  Links will be coming shortly to full lists of Flora and Fauna.

Check out the Dolphins:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1H1_fjvRqs

Dark Skies – Stargazing

Morvern Peninsula being so remote from the urban world has some of the darkest skies in the UK – almost as dark as a photography dark-room – which on clear nights gives excellent conditions for start-gazing.   A stellar telescope is available at Willow Brae for visitors to use on the balcony.

Sea Diving

Lochaline is famous as a centre for Divers, with many wrecks being accessible in the Sound of Mull, together with the wealth of sea creatures this attracts.  A number of operators offer the opportunity to enjoy this sport.  See the links below:

www.lochaline-boats.co.uk/diving.html

www.lochalinedivecentre.co.uk/

 Archaeology

Morvern has been inhabited for thousands of years and has a rich archaeological heritage, much of which has been made accessible, with car parking facilities and interpretation boards.  Discover the Wishing Stone, the “cleared” village of Inniemore, Ardtornish Castle, and the Carved Stones of Kiel – and much, much more.  Morvern Heritage Society list these together with information on the area’s natural heritage on their website:-

http://www.morvernheritagesociety.co.uk/explmorv.html

Geology

Morvern is a truly amazing peninsula, due in no small part to its geology which has a profound effect in the area’s ecology and economy.  A walk into the hills or along the coastline can reveal the richness of its history told in stone – from Basalt to Limestone to the renowned Silica Sand which is mined at Lochaline for the highest quality optical glass.  Whether you want to introduce your youngsters to fossil hunting by a burn at Loch Aline, seek semi-precious stones within black nuggets of rock by Loch Teachis or simply enjoy the variety of rock, Morvern is a delight.

The nearby town of Strontian on the adjacent peninsula of Ardnamurchen gave its name to Strontium which was discovered in the lead mines there in 1790.

Sailing

Morvern boasts an excellent Pontoon facility, Cala Loch Alainn, offering showers, toilets, laundry, waste disposal and information boards as well as fresh water.  http://www.lochalineharbour.co.uk/

Food and Drink

Lochaline Stores is open 8.30 until 6pm Mon-Sat, 11.30-2pm Sundays, and incorporates Morvern Post Office (9-5.30 Mon-Thurs, 9-1 Fri and Sat)

Lochaline Hotel, with restaurant (open to non-residents Wednesday to Sunday) and bar open to non-residents daily.   We recommend reserving your table in advance, www.lochalinehotel.co.uk/ or phone 01967 421657

Lochaline Social Club offers  temporary membership to visitors.

Whitehouse Restaurant, is Michelin commended and prior reservation is strongly advised due to its popularity, to avoid disappointment  –  open late March to late October, closed Sundays and Mondays.   www.thewhitehouserestaurant.co.uk/ or phone 01967 421777

O2 Cafe, Lochaline Dive Centre, this internet cafe offers light meals and snacks indoors or at outdoor seating on the attractive decking area during the daytime.

Lochaline Catch-a-Snack Bar, The Old Pier.  Open 9-5 Mon-Thurs and Saturdays, and 9-7 on Fridays.   A great place to grab a snack whilst waiting for the Ferry to Fishnish on the Isle of Mull.

The Boathouse Restaurant, Kingairloch, is open from Easter until end-October, and offers an excellent cuisine; open for lunch and dinner  from Thursday to Saturday 12pm-8pm and Sunday lunch 12pm-4pm.  Telephone: Phone:01967 411232  or visit www.kingairloch.co.uk/restaurant/ for further details.

The Isles of Mull and Iona

A 20 minute ferry ride takes you from Lochaline to the Isle of Mull.  Visit Tobermory, with its distillery, or tour the island and see the Sea Eagles, climb Ben Mor, or spend a day on Iona soakng up the peaceful atmosphere.  You can also get boat trips to Staffa to see the puffins, and visit Fingal’s Cave.  From Fishnish a ten minute drive takes you to Craignure from where you can get a ferryboat to Oban – the “grand metropolis” of the region.

http://www.naturescotland.com/

Fort William – Mallaig on “The Jacobite” steam train

Reckoned to be one of the loveliest train journeys in the country, with the viaduct featured in the “Harry Potter” movies, advance purchase of tickets is strongly recommended (though there is a regular diesel service along the same line if all you want is the view).  Fort William is about an hour and a quarter away, using the Corran Ferry crossing at Ardgour.

http://www.westcoastrailways.co.uk/jacobite/dates-times-prices-jacobite-steam-train.cfm

Visit Scotland … the rest of your visit

To plan the rest of your visit to Scotland, why not look at Visit Scotland’s updated website.  For a taste of the Scots Spirit go to the VisitScotland website.

https://www.youtube.com/user/VisitScotland

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